Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2001

Abstract

This article assesses the opening three chapters of Hegel's monumental "Science of Logic," a work largely unknown in the United States but recognized in Europe as the foundation of Hegel's impressive philosophical edifice. Hegel's task was to develop a foundation-free philosophy, in which the inherent contradictions in concepts caused the self-destruction of the concept and the generation of a new, improved concept. Hegel begins his work by examining the concept of Pure Being. Being itself shows to be finite, however. Being repeals itself and propels itself into thought. "Reality" therefore gives way to "ideality." Upon entering the realm of the Ideal, Being eventually becomes quantity--content-free being. The opening chapters of the Science of Logic are controversial. Carlson, however, defends Hegel against the various objections that have been raised Hegel's opening moves.

Publication Title

Cardozo Law Review

First Page

425

Volume

22

Included in

Law Commons

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