Event Title

Bring In The Nerds: Secrecy, National Security and the Creation of Intellectual Property Law

Location

Jacob Burns Moot Court Room

Start Date

28-3-2012 4:00 PM

End Date

28-3-2012 6:00 PM

Description

The negotiations of the international Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement and Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement has elevated intellectual property piracy to the level of national security concerns and have therefore been conducted largely in secret. However, the level of actual secrecy has been tiered, with corporate interests enjoying far more access to negotiation information than the general public. At the same time, similar intellectual property issues have been negotiated in the relative transparency of Congress’ debate over the pending Stop Online Piracy Act/PROTECT IP Act and OPEN Act, allowing for much greater public involvement. With national security concerns as the backdrop, the focus of this article is the use of national security arguments to prevent the public from accessing information about the creation of international intellectual property law and proposed ways to think about its implications.

Document Type

Panel Discussion

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Mar 28th, 4:00 PM Mar 28th, 6:00 PM

Bring In The Nerds: Secrecy, National Security and the Creation of Intellectual Property Law

Jacob Burns Moot Court Room

The negotiations of the international Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement and Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement has elevated intellectual property piracy to the level of national security concerns and have therefore been conducted largely in secret. However, the level of actual secrecy has been tiered, with corporate interests enjoying far more access to negotiation information than the general public. At the same time, similar intellectual property issues have been negotiated in the relative transparency of Congress’ debate over the pending Stop Online Piracy Act/PROTECT IP Act and OPEN Act, allowing for much greater public involvement. With national security concerns as the backdrop, the focus of this article is the use of national security arguments to prevent the public from accessing information about the creation of international intellectual property law and proposed ways to think about its implications.